Home / News / Oklahoma public school removes Ten Commandments plaques from classrooms
Oklahoma public school removes Ten Commandments plaques from classrooms

Oklahoma public school removes Ten Commandments plaques from classrooms

Beginning last week, an atheist student in Oklahoma has been dealing with some negative feedback as a result of his contacting the Freedom From Religion Foundation about the Ten Commandments being displayed in the classrooms of his high school.

His complaint and contact of the FFRF has resulted in the Muldrow, Oklahoma Public Schools decision to remove the Decalogue plaques that have been in almost every classroom since many could remember.

Local reporters interviewed some of the students regarding the decision, and one senior named Blakely Palafox offered these comments,

The commandments have been there ever since I can remember, ever since elementary school. I think it’s actually kind of stupid to take away something so important to our school. Those Ten Commandments have been there forever.”

The deciding factor was a letter sent by the Freedom From Religion Foundation to Ron Flanagan, the Superintendent. In that letter was a warning that the plaques represented ' flagrant violation of the Establishment Clause of [the] First Amendment.'

The school decided that in order to avoid what could be a very costly lawsuit, it would just remove the plaques. That advice came from Jerry Richardson, the attorney for the school, who advised fighting it would be pointless, as they would surely lose the case.

The plaques have been up for about two decades.

Annie Laurie Gaylor, the Co-President of the Freedom From Religion Foundation, stated,

"We are pleased the school administration has removed the Ten Commandments, in compliance with the Constitution. This is settled law. Public schools cannot advance or endorse religion. We hope the Board will ‘Honor thy constitution,’ and heed the advice of its attorney rather than to acquiesce to pressure from a religious mob."

Click here for a PDF copy of the FFRF letter.

About Al Stefanelli

Al is a retired author, writer and journalist. His books include "Free Thoughts - A Collection Of Essays By An American Atheist" and "A Voice Of Reason In An Unreasonable World - The Rise Of Atheism On Planet Earth." Al began writing in 1985, starting with the New York Times. In 1993 he joined a McClatchy newspaper, writing a weekly column for ten years. His writing continues to be widely distributed on the Internet and in print. He also produced and hosted a weekly syndicated radio broadcast from 1995 to 1998, and his work won a North Carolina Journalism award in 1998. Al is the former Georgia State Director for American Atheists, Inc., and served on the Board of Directors for "The Clergy Project." He is also a former Southern Baptist Pastor, having served two churches and as pulpit supply for three counties. Currently, he writes part time for The God Discussion, co-hosts the Internet radio programs, "The God Discussion Show" and "Reap Sow Radio." Al lives in the Atlanta suburb of Peachtree City, GA.
  • kris

    Good! Those plaques should have never been displayed in the first place!

  • http://www.facebook.com/louis.minson Louis Minson

    Good!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100004159574184 Vicki Tooley

    lol, why all of the sudden they gonna remove that one?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100004199222702 Kathleen Andresen

    i hope they have good reason upon doing this one

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100004179013970 Ellen Hutcheson

    it is because they are recieving negative feedback upon displaying ten commandments in the calssroom so they decided to take it out

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100004179013970 Ellen Hutcheson

    it is because they are recieving negative feedback upon displaying ten commandments in the calssroom so they decided to take it out

  • extral

    …baby steps

Scroll To Top