Home / News / Hearing begins today involving evangelist Scott Lively regarding whether his anti-gay preaching triggered violent retribution in Uganda
Hearing begins today involving evangelist Scott Lively regarding whether his anti-gay preaching triggered violent retribution in Uganda

Hearing begins today involving evangelist Scott Lively regarding whether his anti-gay preaching triggered violent retribution in Uganda

A hearing in federal court for crimes against humanity will begin today involving Springfield, MA evangelist Scott Lively, filed by plaintiffs in Uganda under the Alien Tort Statute alleging that Lively violated international law with his anti-gay preaching in Uganda.  The lawsuit claims that beginning in 2002, Lively conspired with religious and political leaders in Uganda whipping up anti-gay hysteria with warnings that gays would molest African children and corrupt Ugandan culture.  Goddiscussion.com provides further details:

Cenk Uygur and Ana Kasparian of the Young Turks discussed the extreme anti-gay laws in Uganda and how American evangelists helped to fuel the hate (see video below).  One of those is Scott Lively, author of The Pink Swastika which characterizes the Nazi movement as a gay movement.  Lively was sued in March by Sexual Minorities of Uganda for his work with Uganda's Stephan Langa and Martin Ssempa, anti-gay activists and prominent ministers.  The complaint alleges that he worked with these Ugandan preachers "to dehumanize, demonize, silence and further criminalize the LGBT community" which led to last year's "Kill the Gays" bill considered by the Uganda legislature and to the deaths and persecution of LGBTs in Uganda.

MassLive.com adds that Lively's lawyers claim that he did not trigger any violence and that the violent acts against gays listed in the lawsuit did not involve Lively. A number of YouTube videos has Lively speaking at anti-gay conferences in Uganda. He is also a Holocaust denier, and a proponent of the myth that gay Nazis helped inspire the Holocaust.  The Southern Poverty Law Center adds:

"While we cannot say that homosexuals caused the Holocaust, we must not ignore their central role in Nazism," write Lively and Abrams. "To the myth of the 'pink triangle' — the notion that all homosexuals in Nazi Germany were persecuted — we must respond with the reality of the 'pink swastika.'"

Historians agree that this "reality" is utterly false. But many anti-gay crusaders have used the "gay Nazi" myth as proof that gay people are immoral and destructive.

"When lawlessness is abroad in the land, the same thing will happen here that happened in Nazi Germany," Pat Robertson once warned viewers of his 700 Club. "Many of those people involved with Adolf Hitler were satanists. Many of them were homosexuals. The two seem to go together."

The Pink Swastika has been promoted by anti-gay groups like the Family Defense Council. The FDC's Dr. Howard Hurwitz called the book "a thoroughly researched, eminently readable, demolition of the 'gay' myth, symbolized by the pink triangle, that the Nazis were anti-homosexual."

In fact, while the number of homosexuals who died in the Holocaust does not approach the number of Jewish or Gypsy victims, the historical record shows that between 50,000 and 100,000 men were arrested for homosexuality (or suspicion of it) under the Nazi regime. They were routinely sent to concentration camps and marked with a pink triangle on their prison garb .  They were not systematically exterminated. But huge numbers are believed to have died in the work camps, along with an untold number of homosexual Jews, Gypsies and other "defectives" who were sent to extermination camps.

The myth that Nazis condoned or promoted homosexuality sprang up as a slander against Nazi leaders by their socialist opponents in the 1930s. Only one of the half-dozen leaders in Hitler's inner circle, Ernest Rohm, is believed by credible historians to have been gay.

The "gay Nazi" slander stuck, though, partly because German laws against homosexuals remained in place for a quarter of a century after World War II ended. That effectively silenced many homosexual victims of the Holocaust from telling their stories. A landmark survivor's memoir, The Men With the Pink Triangle, began to break that silence in 1972.

Lively has also been defended by Bryan Fischer of the American Family Association who also promotes the Nazi gay myth.  Fischer blamed the media for "jumping to conclusions and pinning the blame on conservatives."

 

About Dakota O'Leary

Dakota O'Leary is a freethinker, and often sassy, scholar of theology and literature. She got her Bachelor of Arts degree in English and Theology from the State University of New York College at Buffalo, and her Master of Arts degree in Theology and Literature from Antioch University-Midwest. She is a contributing writer focusing on eschatology, biblical prophecy, and general religious news. Dakota is a co-host of the God Discussion radio show, offering insight to the news stories of the week. We like to call her "our in-house Biblical prophecy expert" as her articles on eschatology have received over 200,000 views on God Discussion.
  • Peter

    Unfortunately, this is happening in Uganda. I doubt the suite will go beyond the talking stage. How many Jews did Hitler kill? None, so in jurisprudence he is innocent. But, he talked and wrote about it. In a just world, these obnoxious, racist people will be held account for their actions and writings. It is not a just world.

  • http://www.facebook.com/neel.amin.5245 Neel Amin

    Unfortunately, this is happening in Uganda. I doubt the suite will go
    beyond the talking stage. How many Jews did Hitler kill? None, so in
    jurisprudence he is innocent. But, he talked and wrote about it. In a
    just world, these obnoxious, racist people will be held account for
    their actions and writings. It is not a just world.

  • Pingback: Americans triple their donations to Ugandan missions with introduction of 'kill the gays' legislation | God Discussion

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